How Do They Get Rid Of Confiscated Marijuana?

Discussion in 'Ask a Cop' started by RingoBerry, Feb 6, 2015.

  1. RingoBerry

    RingoBerry Well-Known Member

    I am not well informed about these things but I did hear from a convention I attended during my High School years that confiscated is disposed of by burning. If they are burning it, won't the officers in charge of disposing them be affected by the smoke? I'm sorry but I really don't know these things and I've never smoked weed before though this has always been a question for me. I'd appreciate it very much if someone could explain this to me.
     
  2. missbishi

    missbishi Well-Known Member

    Confiscated marijuana is usually incinerated. It is actually treated before it is burnt to ensure nobody gets high off the fumes!
     
  3. blur92

    blur92 Well-Known Member

    That's interesting. What type of treatment renders it impotent to that degree?
     
  4. RingoBerry

    RingoBerry Well-Known Member

    Oh okay that make a lot of sense. Of course they do something with it first before actually burning >__< I feel silly now.
     
  5. missbishi

    missbishi Well-Known Member

    Don't feel silly, I was wondering the exact same thing myself a few months ago, after hearing about a massive drugs bust on the news. I had a funny picture in my mind of a bunch of cops having a weed bonfire and getting well and truly baked off the fumes! So I had to Google it to make sure that's not what actually happened! This is what happens in the UK...

    Cannabis disposal team - West Midlands Police
     
  6. Kittyworker

    Kittyworker Well-Known Member

    Thats awesome, I never knew they had a specialized squad to remove it. I figured they would just call in the regular evidence collection crew and that disposal would fall on the people who dispose of all the other unclaimed evidence and stuff. I knew they burned it but I always pictured it as being in furnaces like a crematory for some reason.
     
  7. ThatGuyWithTheHat

    ThatGuyWithTheHat Active Member

    I was wondering the same thing. I can't think of anything that could chemically do such a thing.
     
  8. donnalynn47

    donnalynn47 Well-Known Member

    i figured they would burn it. They should grind it up into a fine powder, and scatter it over open fields or something like crop dusters. Enrich the soil so to speak.
     
  9. Shimus

    Shimus Well-Known Member

    The only place I found where this applies is the FBI. General precinct police usually store it and it stays there for ages in cold evidence. I still know a big bust around here sits at the local shop. Not sure what they do with it on this scale; whether they still treat & incinerate but I know my friend said some of it has a habit to "disappear" :rolleyes:
     
  10. pandabear1991

    pandabear1991 Well-Known Member

    Shimus, I have also heard some similar stories, especially in my home state.

    Just to clarify: I do not live in that state any more.

    My Husband is from the lower half of the state where his Mom dated several officers. He has lots of stories!

    I had several friends, where I lived in the northern part of the state, who often took us to the county Deputy-Sheriff's house for weekly weed runs (I didn't sell. Just smoked with buddies after I graduated High School- which is in my past). But I personally saw the bricks and baggies in confiscation/evidence bags with tags. We were not the only ones there buying either.

    My point: The disposal of drug-evidence, depending on the level of jurisdiction, differs by department (whether or not it is supposed to).
     
  11. JoanMcWench

    JoanMcWench Well-Known Member

    From what I've read there are burnings & there are also burials. Apparently, some departments seem to bury their weed in smaller incriminates when they have too much to store. I found that interesting. Nothing like keeping it fresh for gophers.
     
  12. JohnBrock

    JohnBrock Active Member

    So that's why they're so erratically digging in my laws, damn gophers! :D
     

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